Andrew Carnegie

Andrew Carnegie (properly pronounced /kɑrˈneɪɡi/ (kar-NAY-gee), but commonly, though incorrectly, /ˈkɑrnɨɡi/ or /kɑrˈnɛɡi/) (25 November 1835 – 11 August 1919) was a Scottish-American industrialist, businessman, entrepreneur and a major philanthropist. He was one of the most famous leaders of industry of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He emigrated to the United States as a child with his parents. His first job in the United States was as a factory worker in a bobbin factory. Later, he became a bill logger for the owner of the company. Soon after he became a messenger boy. Eventually he progressed up the ranks of a telegraph company. He built Pittsburgh's Carnegie Steel Company, which was later merged with Elbert H. Gary's Federal Steel Company and several smaller companies to create U.S. Steel. With the fortune he made from business, he later turned to philanthropy and interests in education, founding the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Carnegie Mellon University and the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh. Carnegie gave away most of his money to establish many libraries, schools, and universities in America, the United Kingdom and...
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